Public Protector Busi Mkhwebane found that the President misled Parliament and violated the Executive Ethics Code by not disclosing the CR17 donations. Photo: Jacques Naude/African News Agency (ANA)

CAPE TOWN – The Anti-poverty Forum (APF) has called on the South African Revenue Services (Sars) Commissioner Edward Kieswetter to have a CR17 campaign fund donation investigation regarding possible tax law violations.

In an open letter to Kieswetter, the APF said there were possible tax law violations linked to the donations.

“As the APF, we have decided to approach Sars and call on it to fulfil its duties as prescribed in Chapter 13 of the Constitution of the Republic and Tax Administration Act No. 28 of 2011. In particular Paragraph 3 (2)(a-h), under which Sars is legally obligated to investigate possible or alleged tax offence and if need be, lay criminal charges against perpetrators,” the APF said in the letter.

In July, Public Protector Busi Mkhwebane found that President Cyril Ramaphosa misled Parliament and violated the Executive Ethics Code by not disclosing the CR17 donations.

President Cyril Ramaphosa misled Parliament in July and violated the Executive Ethics Code by not disclosing the CR17 donations. File Photo: IOL
President Cyril Ramaphosa misled Parliament in July and violated the Executive Ethics Code by not disclosing the CR17 donations. File Photo: IOL

Mkhwebane referred the matter to the National Director of Public Prosecutions for further investigation into the prima facie evidence of money laundering uncovered during the investigation.

In response to questions from Business Report Sars said a tax inquiry was private and confidential in nature, therefore, was not in a position to provide details on the matter.

“Sars is bound by Chapter 6 of the Tax Administration Act, 2011, dealing with confidentiality of information, and more specifically section 69 of the Act, which provides for the secrecy of taxpayer information,” Sars said. “This includes investigations into taxpayers or traders.”